I got the opportunity to interview Sullee J , who is a hip hop artist from Baltimore and   has amassed a global following with his lyrical, captivating positive sound of Hip Hop. Sullee J has collaborated with Royce Da 5’9 , Canibus , Kuniva of D12 , K-Rino and Diabolic to name a few. I was able to delve into his early beginnings and find out his thoughts on the Baltimore riots.

Hi , How are you ?

Grateful

So how did your interest in music begin ?

Poetry in elementary school. I wrote a short poem for the first time, and I remember my teacher telling me for a kid at that age, it was very deep and analytical. She stated that I had one of the best written in the class. I actually made it a standard after that to continue writing short poems. I started posting them online for years, everything from speaking on nature, to eventually how I felt inside.

At what point did you decide to make it a professional career ?

After high school. Even though a few of my friends I’d kick it with back then messed around and put to- gether a few songs in the studio, it wasn’t at the level or mind set it became afterwords.

What was the first track you ever recorded and describe the experience ?

If we’re talking before I got serious, it was in senior year of high school. I still remember hitting a random studio in someone’s house in Baltimore, it felt crazy. It was just something differ- ent. This was almost 13-14 years ago. Another point to make is, now days in my culture, it’s still not widely accepted, although there is a million artist trying to do it. Back then, it felt like there was about 5-10 of us all around. It was something new to me. I’ve always loved the hip hop scene growing up, but it’s a whole different love when you become the hip hop scene.

What would you say was the climax of your music career ?

When you grind like I do, 24/7, everyday feels like a climax. I believe that because, if today’s not better than yesterday, nothing has progressed. That doesn’t mean you have to see a change right away, or something big has to happen, it just means you’re persistent and trying different ways. People don’t fail until they stop moving. Keep moving. Too many people sitting in rocking chairs believing in illusions.

Outside of music, what do you enjoy doing the most ?

Living. Don’t forget to do that. Sometimes we get so wrapped up in chasing our dreams, we lose all perception of reali- ty.

What challenges have you faced as an unsigned hip hop artist?

Fraudulent people. Lots of them.

Are you working on any new music as we speak?

Over 100 songs in the catalog still unreleased and I just got signed to Bogish Brand Group recently as apart of the group Tripl3 Threat. The group includes Sullee J, Vibe & BTodd. We got heat from producers around the world. Shout out to the whole squad!

How is Baltimore as a city and did the riots create any opportunities for change or do you believe there is more that can be done?

Baltimore city is home. Pre/Post-Ri- ots, to attain justice is a constant battle. If there is a place out there where they feel like no more can be done, they have ultimately failed. As long as their is good souls, they’re will be bad souls. We just need more people awake universally so we can change that statistic of the righteous to majority vs currently minority. I see a lot of innovation with technology, buildings, businesses, but I don’t see growth in morality, love, respect.

Do you believe that Islam is misrepresented by the world at large and how can so- ciety change this rhetoric ?

Yes. Read the Qu’Ran, not google. Don’t believe the News, they generalize and fabricate almost everything. Majority of the “truth” on TV is about as real as a goosebumps book.

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