To capture the attention of the general British public and create a Twitter storm these days as a music act is no mean feat, and that is something new supergroup, McBusted, managed to achieve earlier this week when they announced a UK tour next Spring.

The reaction to the McBusted announcement was rare, (and only ever seen from acts that have a huge PR team at their disposal). But when the whole of McFly and 2 members of Busted with their small, (by today’s standards), PR team and strategy announced they were joining forces, they became a trending topic in the UK on Twitter, with hoards of people of all ages sharing their excitement online.

What makes the whole announcement an even bigger achievement is that the press conference was quite simple and low budget. It was just the band playing some old footage and simply announcing an arena tour for next year in a small building on a Monday morning, with a handful of journalists. Simple. No tricks, nothing fancy and there wasn’t loads of money thrown at it. Which makes you think, if a band that hasn’t been around for nearly 10 years can just get together with their musical pals (who have their own steady career), email a simple flyer to journalists and make this announcement at a small press conference, does that not completely undermine the huge PR campaigns of other acts? Like those from X Factor with the media power of Simon Cowell behind them, or American acts with lavish campaigns or happen to do something outrageous, (I’m looking at you Miley Cyrus), in order to gain attention and publicity. Surely, McBusted have proven all you need is some talent and a loyal fanbase that has been patiently waiting for this moment for almost a decade and the rest – excitement and internet takeovers will follow naturally.

But what is the future for the supergroup? Well the plan is to tour in April/May next year. There is to be no TV show, which would surely be a missed opportunity as a TV show following the band on tour, would definitely pull in big audiences; and no album/or new music but maybe that will change.

On the topic of new music, Tom Fletcher from McFly was quoted by NME as saying;

“For now it’s just the tour, but if we come up with something and write some songs that we think are incredible, then we’ll release it.” and Digital Spy quoted James Bourne from Busted saying; “there’s no plan for new music, but maybe we will because we have written together in the past.”

Though the bands have written together in the past in particular James, co-writing some of McFly songs and Tom, co-writing some Busted songs, I can see why there won’t be an album. Though Busted are back it is only 2 of them, Charlie Simpson will not be joining fellow bandmates Matt Willis and James Bourne preferring to stick with his solo project. They have joined McFly now but they are still a recording and touring band in their own right who plan to have a new album out next year. To release an album together would be brilliant for fans, but for McFly, it would be a risk that the media from then on, are likely to focus constantly on their role with McBusted and not their own band, detrimental when trying to promote their own music. Though Matt and James could continue to release music together as Busted, with or without Charlie, or separately, Matt has already released a really good solo album after Busted split and James released music with his band, Son of Dork.

The future of McBusted in the long term is uncertain, we have no idea what the band will decide after the tour but we do know there will be a tour which is bound to sell out and be a complete success. Whether the band change their mind on things they have previously said no to remains to be seen, but for now it seems the world is very happy to have McBusted.

From day one they have shown you don’t need to have a huge team of people around you to be successful. All you need is your friends, some musical talent and passion for what you do – recognition, fans and hysteria will come in their own time. Nor does it need to be manufactured by huge, hard to ignore PR campaigns.

Written by Charlotte Pearson

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