In sad news to all party rockers, American rapper Rick Ross has sued LMFAO for copyright infringement on the popular party hit, “Party Rock Anthem.” Ross claims that the rapper duo has copied lyrics and tune from his 2006 song, “Hustlin.” According to Ross, the line that has been featured on everything from t-shirts to billboards—“everyday I’m shufflin’”—is explicitly stolen, even down to the way that LMFAO sing it.

While I am not an expert on musical plagiarism and copyright infringement (the courts will have to determine that) something about this accusation seems a bit curious. Ross is a fairly renowned rapper, his most recent album being, “God Forgives, I Don’t.” The said-infringed single, “Hustlin,” is one of his most famous works, earning platinum status. However, Ross has gotten into a bit of trouble with his lyrics. Most recently, in August he was booted as a Rebook’s representative for a phrase that explicitly insinuated date rape.

Now, it seems out of the blue, Ross accuses the ridiculously successful and high earning LMFAO for their lyrics. One must note that the accused song, “Party Rock Anthem,” was released in 2011, that is, three years ago. Further, it was at the height of its reign two years ago. The question becomes evident: “Why now?”

“Party Rock Anthem” has been a necessity in uni party playlists since its release. In 2011, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 and stayed at number one for six straight weeks. As of May 2013, it sold over 7.6 million digital copies. Countless advertisements and television series have featured the song and made “every day I’m shufflin'” a cultural icon, being featured on t shirts, posters, mugs, and any other sellable memorabilia.

With the combination of Ross’ recent notoriety, LMFAO’s success, and the possibly convenient similarity of the two lyrics, one can’t blame Ross for taking advantage of the moment and getting a bit of ‘positive’ press for once. However, there is also a possibility that Ross has not listened to top 40 hits for the past three years, or attended any club or party, and somehow missed it’s musical presence. Possibly.

Additionally, one must as, is Rick Ross making a big deal over nothing? Is “everyday I’m shufflin’” an original gem and Ross is just hearing things? Don’t take my word for it, but give it a listen yourself.

Written by Brittany Burns

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