UK hip-hop collective, Enter the Commission, are back with their second release “The Great Commission”. It’s a slight departure from their previous work, but The Great Commission shows the groups continued drive and ambition to develop a style that is all their own.

The mix tape begins with the scatty, and slightly disjointed “Truth Slaves“. It’s the mishmash of samples that leaves the track feeling a little forgettable. But luckily the album proceeds to get better and better, without ever looking back.

There’s a distinctly electronic feel to The Great Commission. But the album is at it’s most powerful when the production takes a back seat and lets the superb rapping burst out. Like on the track; “Commission Get’em“; the simple electro backdrop allowing the tight rhymes to come to the fore. “Final Hour” is another example of the power of the collective’s raps; it’ll dispel any doubts over the group’s ability to move and motivate through music.

That’s not to say the beats aren’t impressive. Tracks like “Finer Things” show the groups obvious expertise at crafting perfect balanced tunes to spit their lyrics over. “Whats Dat” superb is a dub influenced slow jam. The rapping flows fantastically over a deep bass groove. “360’s” bass line is magnificent, and the song is another one of many highlights. Smooth soulful closer “Letter To Hip-Hop” beautifully blends passionate lyrical content with suave trumpet and sexy backing singing; providing a welcome break from the ferocity and intenseness of the albums other eleven tracks.

UK hip-hop has never quite hit the heights of its overseas counterpart. And The Great Commission sounds best when these overseas influences come out strongest. The grime-tinged tracks like “Twilight Flow” come off second best to the slower, heavier stuff. The group wears their influences firmly on their sleeves. You can hear strong tones of Biggie, Tupac and N.W.A in their work. But these styles come together to create a cohesive, classic but yet original, sound.

The Great Commission is something of a challenge to UK hip-hop artists, to dare to take the collective’s crown as the countries freshest group. From the strength of this latest mix-tape, I wouldn’t bet on anyone doing it.  They may lack some of the swagger and arrogance of the American rap immortals. But Enter the Commission are surely one of the best British hip-hop artists out there at the moment. If you’re in any doubt listen to The Great Commission and marvel at the expert blend of hip-hop past and present. It’s one of the freshest albums you’ll hear this year.

 

Written by Robbie Bryson

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